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pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
. call or click today. >>> pakistan arrest as doctor for helping the cia in its efforts to nail osama bin laden. dr. t. is accused of trying to collect dna from people in bin laden's compound to prove he was there. cnn's reza sayah joins us live from islamabad. give us a sense about this doctor. he allegedly set up this fake vaccination drive? what was that about? >> reporter: yeah. we've been trying to put together bits and pieces of this alleged plot, and it really gives you a fascinating glimpse of how the cia was operating on the ground here in pakistan before the raid on the bin laden compound. a pakistani official has telling us this doctor has been arrested, accused of helping the cia to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden and allegedly stage add free vaccination campaign offering free vaccinations and shots to children and residents of abbottabad where the bin laden compound was located. according to the british paper "the guardian" he hired two nurses going around from house to house. the plan was to get to the bin laden children, somehow extract some of their blood or use
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
. information found by u.s. navy zeals when they invatd bin laden's compound in pakistan show the strains inside bin laden's terror network. he was spending as much time dealing with al qaeda's struggles as he was dealing with no terror attacks. good morning. >> good morning, alex. >> what's this information telling us? >> a great deal about the organization which was now fragmented, difficult to control and finance. apparently riddled with trade traitors. it demonstrates that osama bin laden was obsessed with the follow up attack on the united states after 9/11. despite the fact that lots oof people in the organization wanted to work harder to establish a -- across the muslim war. he was focused on the united states and a big follow up, a big splashy attack which never occurred. >> all this from this new report in "the washington post" telling us al qaeda groups were complaining about the drone attacks which shows that they were working. >> they were indeed. matter of fact a large number of complaints about drone attacks. he himself in several emails talked about his concern that his ranks were
violence erupting in pakistan, gunmen in the streets of karachi, opening fire, leaving seven dead and more than two dozen injured. >>> dozens of suspects connected to the mexican mafia in custody after a huge gang raid in california. the mexican mafia, considered the oldest and most powerful prison gang in the u.s. >>> astronauts on board atlantis, international space station as well, getting their morning wake-up call today. listen to this: >> ♪ >> ♪ if you believed. >> ♪ >> ♪ they put a man on the moon. >> ♪ >> ♪ good morning atlantis! this is michael stripe from r.e.m. we wish you much success on your mission and thank all the women and men at nasa who have worked on shuttle for three decades, from earth, a very good morning to you. >> ♪ >> ♪ >> ♪ >> ♪ bill: how cool is that, huh? sir elton yesterday did that. martha: wouldn't that be cool, wake up up every morning and give you a call? >> bill: we're going to talk to them next week and let you know how -- know how they're doing on the last mission. so stay tuned for that. martha: and in court, we are getting reports
'll remember that a lot of documents were taken from osama bin laden's compound in pakistan. well, apparently, we're learning what those documents showed. and the information that we're getting now is that u.s. president barack obama and general david petraeus were actually specifically mentioned as targets for al qaeda in these documents and that the mode of attack was even talked about. it involved destroying their aircraft when they were in the region. now, this is a source that's familiar with these materials that were recovered from the compound. they are telling us now what these documents said. once again, when the navy s.e.a.l.s stormed that compound that you're looking at right now back on may 2nd with the hopes of taking out osama bin laden, the most wanted terrorist on the fbi's most wanted list, when they took those documents, retrieved those documents and those computers, documents now saying that general david petraeus and president barack obama were both targets of al qaeda. going into detail about when they were going to be in the region, how they were going to target their ai
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)